Institute for Social Justice

Director

Management

Professor Nikolas Kompridis

Professor Nikolas Kompridis

Research Professor in Philosophy and Political Thought and Director of the Institute for Social Justice

Nikolas Kompridis is Research Professor in Philosophy and Political Thought and Director of the Institute for Social Justice. He is the author of The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (Bloomsbury, 2014) Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future (MIT, 2006), Philosophical Romanticism (Routledge, 2006), and over 50 articles on a very broad spectrum of topics in philosophy and political theory.

Originally trained as a musician (the University of Toronto and Yale University), he was the founder and director of the Canadian new music ensemble, Sound Pressure, during which time he worked with some of the world’s leading composers – Frederic Rzewski, Martin Bresnick, Louis Andriessen, and David Lang, among others. After a decade long-career in music he was drawn into an academic career, inspired by the Critical Theory tradition, which eventually took him to Frankfurt, where he worked with Jürgen Habermas as a postdoctoral fellow in the philosophy department at J.W. Goethe University. Drawing on the traditions of Critical Theory, Political Theory, Philosophical Romanticism, and American Pragmatism, his work has been concerned with rethinking the meaning of reason, critique, normativity, and agency from the perspective of his conceptions of “reflective disclosure” and “receptivity” (in Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future, and other writings). This larger project also involves rethinking democratic practices of collective self-reflection and democratic practices of institutional and cultural change.

He is currently completing two new books, one receptivity and critique, and the other on political romanticism. Among his future projects is an ambitious rethinking of what it means to be human in the age of the Anthropocene, beyond the limitations of both humanism and posthumanism. Other projects include a book on the philosophy of music (after Adorno) and a book on the filmmaker, Jean-Luc Godard.

  • Articles

    “Public Reason, Secularism, and the Limits of Translation,” Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy, forthcoming 2016.

    “Romanticism and Moral Perfectionism: Cavell’s Abandonment of Modernism,” Conversations: The Journal of Cavellian Studies, Vol. 1(3), 2014.

    “Critique, Normativity, and the New: A Reply to Amy Allen,” Critical Horizons, Vol. 14(1), 2014, pp. 1–13.

    “Receptivity and Recognition: Forms of Normative Response in the Lives of the Animals We Are,” New Literary History, Vol. 144(1), April, 2013.

    “Receptivity, Possibility, and Democratic Politics,” Ethics and Global Politics, Vol. 4(4), 2011, pp. 255–272.

    On Critique and Disclosure: A Reply to Four Generous Critics, “Philosophy and Social Criticism, 37(9), pp.1063–1077, 2011.

    “Technology’s Challenge to Democracy: What of the Human?” Parrhesia, Issue 8, 2009, pp. 20–33.

    “Struggling Over the Meaning of Recognition: A Matter of Identity, Justice, or Freedom?” European Journal of Political Theory Vol.6 (3), 2007, pp. 277–289.

    “The Unsettled and Unsettling Claims of Culture: Reply to Seyla Benhabib,” Political Theory, Vol. 34(3), 2006, pp. 389–396.

    “Normativizing Hybridity/Neutralizing Culture,” Political Theory, Vol. 33(3), June 2005, pp. 318–343.

    “Disclosing Possibility: The Past and Future of Critical Theory” International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 13, Number 3, 2005, pp. 325–351.

    “From Reason to Self-Realization? On the ‘Ethical Turn’ in Critical Theory,” Critical Horizons, Vol. 5.1 Summer 2004, pp. 323–360.

    “Amidst the Plurality of Voices: Philosophy of Music after Adorno,” Angelaki: A Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol. 8(3), 2003, pp. 167–180.

    “So We Need Something Else for Reason to Mean,” International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 8(3), 2000, pp. 271–295.

    “Reorienting Critique: From Ironist Theory to Transformative Practice,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, Vol. 26(4), 2000, pp. 23–47.

    “On World Disclosure: Heidegger, Habermas, and Dewey,” Thesis Eleven, Number 37, Spring, 1994, pp. 29–45.

  • Books

    The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014), 328 pages.

    Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006)

    Philosophical Romanticism (London and New York: Routledge, 2006)

  • Book Chapters

    “Living (One’s) Skepticism: Cavell, Romanticism, and Philosophy” in Stephen Heatherington and David MacArthur, Living Skepticism (Brill, 2016).

    “What do we talk about when we talk about transcendence?,” John Caruana and Mark Cauchi (eds), Worlds of Transcendence: Postsecular Cinema in The Tree of Life and Melancholia (SUNY, 2016).

    “Founding Political Critique in a Post-Political World: Towards a Renewal of Utopian Energies,” in Albena Azmanova and Mihaela Mihai (editors), Reclaiming Democracy: Judgment, Responsibility and the Right to Politics (New York: Routledge, 2015).

    “Towards a Counter-Science of the Human,” in Lewis Gordon (ed.), Transcending Disciplinary Decadence (London and Delhi: Routledge, 2015).

    “Turning and Returning: The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought,” Introductory chapter to The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014) pp. xiv–xxxvii.

    “Recognition and Receptivity: Forms of Normative Response in the Lives of the Animals We Are,” The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2014) pp. 145– 168.

    “Political Romanticism,” Michael Gibbons (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Thought (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014).

    “Désunité de la raison, ouverture réflexive et politique démocratique,” Iain Macdonald, Pierre-François Noppen, Gérard Raulet (eds), Les normes et le possible. Héritage et perspectives de l’École de Francfort (Paris: Éditions de la Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2013), pp. 187-207.

    “Kritik, Zeit, Geschichte,” in Christian Schmidt (ed.), Konnen Wir Der Zeit Entkommen? (Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 2013), pp. 21-41.

    “Romanticism”, Richard Eldridge (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009) pp. 247-270.

    “The Idea of a New Beginning: A Romantic Source of Normativity and Freedom” Nikolas Kompridis (ed.), Philosophical Romanticism (London: Routledge, 2006) pp. 32-59.

    “Re-inheriting Philosophical Romanticism,” Nikolas Kompridis (ed.), Philosophical Romanticism (London: Routledge, 2006) pp. 1-19.

    “Heidegger’s Challenge and the Future of Critical Theory,” Peter Dews (ed.), Habermas: A Critical Reader (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1999) pp. 118–152.